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's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, candidly to the chinese in both washington d.c. and beijing in my case. >> in beijing, what is the view that you can tell of kim jong-un about what power he has, who he is, what its capabilities are to stay in north korea? >> the chinese believe we need to give north korea a chance in and develop economically. china would like all the parties that are part of the six party talks to get back to the table and to see if we can't encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold and abiding by their international obligations. so that's a difference of opinion as strategy. china believes we have to engage with north korea. the united states does every time to try to engage with north korea, they basically turned around and fail to respond to their promises and live up to promises and it gets us nowhere. we don't believe we should reward bad behavior. he knocked what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you everyday? what are they looking for? >> they want gr
deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions so we're very excited to bring the sensitive conversations about the issues driving washington thanks to the bank of america. thank you to your colleagues. you may have
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
of the founders of this institution the administration of washington was using the recession and the ongoing depression as the pretext to turn the american public against a free enterprise system and was doing so with the tools of class warfare half. this sounds remarkably similar to today and was the belief of our founders that unless something changed, something big was going to happen and something bad, the american economy and indeed to the american society. as we all know, something was about to happen in 1938 and we certainly hope something like that isn't about to happen today. we will get a view of tonight's speaker about what the next great revolution will look like in american politics. jim as i said is the president of the science foundation and he's written and edited books for many years on policy and politics. he's been a leading voice in the conservative intellectual movement and a central figure in before lamb preppie in higher education. we are honored to have him here. jim piereson. [applause] >> thanks very much, arthur. it's a great pleasure to be back at aei to renew a f
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